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The Mind of James Donahue

Rewards For The Scribe

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Hadit

The Rapture Of Hadit In Hiding
 
 
"There is a light before thine eyes, o prophet, a light undesired, most desirable. I am uplifted in thine heart; and the kisses of the stars rain hard upon thy body. Thou art exhaust in the voluptuous fullness of the inspiration; the expiration is sweeter than death, more rapid and laughterful than a caress of Hell's own worm. Oh! thou art overcome: we are upon thee; our delight is all over thee: hail! hail: prophet of Nu! prophet of Had! prophet of Ra-Hoor-Khu! Now rejoice! now come in our splendour & rapture! Come in our passionate peace, & write sweet words for the Kings. I am the Master: thou art the Holy Chosen One." Liber al vel Legis 2:61-65
 
Verses 61 through 65 parallel with Nuit's love song in Chapter One, in which She seeks the love of the stars and declares her love in turn for all creation. Nuit's words then end with the call in Verse 65: "To me! To me!"
 
Hadit's message approaches love in a different way. He talks of the inspiration of service, the rewards of His favor, and the splendor and rapture of life and death.
 
This seems to be a message for the scribe, Aleister Crowley, who by this time, on a second consecutive day of scribbling the words of Aiwass during that strange encounter in Cairo, is getting tired and perhaps experiencing more thoughts of resistance. After all, he is being forced by the power of Hadit within him to write thoughts and ideas contrary to his Buddhist training.
 
If we peal away the layers, however, there is inspiration here for all stars. The power and splendor of the creators is available to us all. For Crowley it was an especially pleasant reward, as we shall see.
 
Crowley was quite aware that he was involved in an extraordinary supernatural experience. He described Aiwass as a figure of a man. I have a sense of a ghostly apparition that appeared and faded, almost like a light in a darkened room. This would describe the statement: "There is a light before thine eyes, o prophet, a light undesired, most desirable." While Crowley was tiring, perhaps wishing his task was over, he also was fascinated. Thus the light to him was both "undesired" and at the same time "desired."
 
At this point, Crowley described a personal embrace by Hadit that gave him extreme pleasure. In the writer's own words: "The prophet was rapt away by the God. The revelation of the 'hiding' of Hadit had by now sunk into the soul of the Beast, so that he realized himself."
 
As he received the words: "I am uplifted in thine heart; and the kisses of the stars rain hard upon thy body," Crowley said he personally felt "the athletic rapture of Nuit's embrace."
 
"Thou art exhaust in the voluptuous fullness of the inspiration; the expiration is sweeter than death, more rapid and laughterful than a caress of Hell's own worm." By now the scribe was experiencing a personal rapture that he could only compare to sexual orgasm. Crowley noticed, as have I, that the message in the Book of the Law is always that death is a delightful experience awaiting each of us.
 
By the time he was writing: "Oh! thou art overcome: we are upon thee; our delight is all over thee," Crowley said he was "completely swallowed up in the ecstasy."
 
Hadit, the energy, rewarded his Earthly scribe in a physical way. Like Nuit's song, it was the natural way for Him to express the love of the creator.
 
The verses conclude: "hail! hail: prophet of Nu! prophet of Had! prophet of Ra-Hoor-Khu! Now rejoice! now come in our splendour & rapture! Come in our passionate peace, & write sweet words for the Kings."
 
The clarity of the authors of the Book of the Law is presented here. Book One originates from Nuit. Book Two from Hadit. Book Three will be delivered by the son, Horus.
 
Crowley is called to "come in our splendour & rapture," and "in our passionate peace" suggesting that all three energies, or Gods, are present with him. The task of the scribe is simply to "write sweet words for the Kings."
 
The Kings are the leaders, the ones who hear the call of Horus and bring about the dramatic changes in the way the world runs. Not all stars are kings. But all stars are summoned to submit to the leadership of the kings.
 
Verse 65 is a tribute. "I am the Master: Thou are the Holy Chosen One." Crowley was chosen for the holy work of the Gods.
 
Copyright - James Donahue

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